Sunday, September 10, 2006

Sainte-Irving, blog entry by George, Aug 16 06

http://www.bookninja.com/?p=1318
Blog entry Aug 16 06
By George

The best way to honour Irving Layton is to name a street in a banal, non-Montreal bedroom suburb subdivision after him — I’m sure he’d appreciate that — Irving would want Sainte-Catherine renamed Sainte-Irving.

2 comments on “Summer reno rundown”

1. B.G. Rotchin says:
August 16th, 2006 at 10:31 am

Sorry George, Cote St-Luc is not “a banal, non-Montreal bedroom suburb subdivision” but a centrally colcated community on the island of Montreal where Layton lived in the 50’s and raised his family.
2. George says:
August 16th, 2006 at 10:34 am

Busted.

Street Naming, League of Cdn Poets, Aug 06

http://www.poets.ca/index.html
STREET TO HONOUR POET IRVING LAYTON

The late Montreal poet Irving Layton will have a street in the Montreal borough of Côte St. Luc named in his honour. Irving Layton Ave. will be the name of a new residential road off Midway Ave. near Parkhaven Ave., according to mayor of Côte St. Luc Anthony Housefather. "There is an important local connection. We tend to name streets after people who are locally known or internationally known," Housefather said. A street dedication ceremony will take place in late fall, according to Housefather. Members of Layton's family and Côte St. Luc residents will be invited to witness the unveiling of the new street sign. For full Montreal Gazette article click here.

CULTURE MONTRÉAL NEWSLETTER, Jan 17 06

http://www.culturemontreal.ca/lettreinfo/060117_newsletter.htm
CULTURE MONTRÉAL NEWSLETTER
January 17, 2006
Irving Layton (1912-2006)

Israel Pincu Lazarovitch, a.k.a. Irving Layton, earned local fame at birth as he was born naturally circumcised, which orthodox Jews believe is a mark of the Messiah. Born in Romania, he immigrated to Montréal with his family when he was a year old. A poet, novelist and essayist, Layton is the most well known of a group of Montréal poets who broke from Romantic poetry in the 1940s. His work is marked by great sensitivity and contempt for what he considered the hypocrisy of society. Among the many publications of this prolific writer is A Red Carpet for the Sun (1959), which won a Governor General’s Literary Award. In 1981, he was nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature. Irving Layton taught extensively throughout his life and drew large audiences to his lectures and talks. He died in Montréal on January 4, 2006, at the age of 93.

Aislin Cartoon, Montreal Gazette, Aug 16 06

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/aislin/0816.html
Aislin cartoon
August 16 Montreal Gazette

Cartoon Sparks Anger, by M. Barry, West End Chronicle, Aug 24 06

http://www.westendchronicle.com
The Chronicle
By MARTIN C. BARRY

Cartoon sparks anger among Layton associates
Aislin cartoon a ‘cheap shot’, says woman who cared for Layton at Maimonides

PHOTO:
Courtesy, Rami Negev Standing before a template of the new bilingual street sign for Irving Layton Avenue are (left to right) councillors Allan J. Levine, Ruth Kovac, Mike Cohen, Mayor Anthony Housefather and Director of Library Services Tanya Abramovitch. In the back row are: councillors Sam Goldbloom, Dida Berku and Acting City Manager Ken Lerner.

A cartoon ridiculing the designation of a Côte St. Luc street in honour of celebrated poet and former resident Irving Layton has aroused the anger of two longtime Layton associates.

“Displeasure is a mild word,” said Musia Schwartz, who was mandated to attend to many of Layton’s needs at the Maimonides Geriatric Centre in Côte St. Luc during the last seven years of his life. Schwartz was reacting to an Aislin editorial cartoon, published in The Gazette last week.

In it, a street post is shown, on top of which are two signs bearing the names ‘Côte St. Luc’ and ‘Lust’ — a reference to a recurring erotic theme in Layton’s earlier work. To Schwartz, however, it was a cheap shot. In addition, she said the Montreal daily heavily edited a letter she submitted to them.

“Irreverence is one thing,” Schwartz said in an interview. But “I mean, please, ‘lust.’ ... I know he (Aislin) is entitled to his satires and the rest of it, but this is such gratuitous mockery and so unimaginative.

“Layton would really chuckle at the thought that he’s being remembered for this,” she added. But “it’s the ungenerosity of spirit ... This sort of idiotic cliché that I thought that now that he’s dead would be over.”

Anna Pottier, Layton’s widow from his last marriage, agreed wholeheartedly. “There is so much more to Irving than that hoary old stereotype, which is so passé,” she said in an e-mail. “Granted, back two or three decades ago, Irving didn’t mind putting that image out there — with the hope that, once having gotten people’s attention, they would turn to the work ... For Aislin to try and limit Irving to that old cliché shows how out-of-synch Aislin is.”

Last week, Côte St. Luc city council adopted a resolution to name a new residential street after Layton, who died last January at the age of 93. Irving Layton Avenue will be situated behind St. Richard’s Church and Maimonide School, bordering Guelph Road, Parkhaven Avenue and Chamberland Crescent. Twelve new homes are presently under construction and are expected to be ready for occupancy in early winter.

An extraordinarily prolific writer and poet, Layton published 50 books between 1945 and 1992. His poetry had a lyrical and romantic style. He taught at Concordia University (then Sir George Williams) from 1950 to 1964, and returned in 1989 for a year as writer-in-residence.

“In terms of toponomy it is our objective to recognize individuals with a direct connection to Côte St. Luc, who in their lifetime made significant contributions to both society and their community,” said Councillor Mike Cohen, who chairs the city’s toponomy commission.

“We are proud that Irving Layton lived for long periods of his life in Côte St. Luc, brought up two of his children in our community and spent his last years here,” added Mayor Anthony Housefather.

Cartoon Disappoints by B. Baum, Canada.com, Aug 17 06

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette
Montreal Gazette
Letter
Published: Thursday, August 17, 2006

I found the Aislin cartoon "dissing" Irving Layton (Gazette, Aug. 16) DISappointing, DISrespectful, DISingenuous and DISturbing.

The late poet was a major contributor to the literary culture of Montreal, Quebec and Canada, and I find it repugnant to see a mockery made of his memory.

Barbara Baum

Montreal

Fitting Tribute, the Montreal Gazette, Aug 15 06

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette
Montreal Gazette
KRISTIN MORENCY, IRWIN BLOCK of The Gazette contributed to this report, The Gazette
Published: Thursday, August 17, 2006

The naming of a new avenue in Cote St. Luc after the late Montreal poet Irving Layton is a fitting tribute to one of Canada's greatest writers, local poet and essayist David Solway says.

"I knew him for for many years and considered him my uncle," Solway said yesterday at his home in Hudson.

"I would say Irving invented poetry for Canada, and he helped put Montreal on the map."

Layton, his disciple Leonard Cohen, and A.M. Klein before them, "made Canadian poetry," Solway said.

"Better to name a street after a poet than a politician or real-estate developer," he said.

Irving Layton Ave. will be a new residential thoroughfare off Midway Ave., near Parkhaven Ave., Cote St. Luc Mayor Anthony Housefather said.

"Irving Layton is an internationally renowned author and poet who spent much of his life in Cote St. Luc," the mayor said.

"There is an important local connection. We tend to name streets after people who are locally known or internationally known," Housefather added.

"We looked at various names, including (those of) other prominent local residents recently deceased, and decided on (Layton)."

A dedication ceremony is to take place in the late fall, Housefather said.

Members of Layton's family and Cote St. Luc residents will be invited to witness the unveiling of the new street sign.

Layton's family and friends will be welcome to say a few words about him at the ceremony, Housefather added.

Layton died Jan. 4 at the age of 93 after a five-year battle with Alzheimer's disease.

He spent the last years of his life at the Maimonides Geriatric Centre in Cote St. Luc.

Layton wrote more than 50 books of poetry and remains one of Canada's most prolific and revered writers.

kmorency@thegazette.canwest.com

Irving Layton Avenue, Montreal Gazette, Aug 15 06

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette
The Montreal Gazette
Published: Tuesday, August 15, 2006

The late Montreal poet Irving Layton will have a Côte St. Luc street named in his honour. Irving Layton Ave. will be the name of a new residential road off Midway Ave. near Parkhaven Ave., according to mayor of Côte St. Luc Anthony Housefather.

"Irving Layton is an internationally renowned author and poet who spent much of his life in Côte St. Luc," Housefather said.

"There is an important local connection. We tend to name streets after people who are locally known or internationally known," he added.

A street dedication ceremony will take place in late fall, according to Housefather.

Members of Layton’s family and Côte St. Luc residents will be invited to witness the unveiling of the new street sign.

Street Naming, Waterloo Record, Aug 18 06

https://secure.therecord.com
The Waterloo Record
Poet Irving Layton to have street named for him

Legendary Montreal poet Irving Layton will have a street named for him in his old neighbourhood in the city of Côte Saint-Luc.

Council Monday night voted to name a street that is still being built Irving Layton Avenue.

Layton died Jan. 4 at a Montreal residence for seniors. He had been battling Alzheimer's disease for some time. The author of more than 40 books of poetry and essays was widely considered one of English Canada's pre-eminent poets.

He was once nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature, but was beaten out by Gabriel García Márquez, a Colombian novelist.

The director of the Eleanor London Côte Saint-Luc Public Library, Tanya Abramovitch, said Tuesday people still remember him and his regular visits to the library.

"They loved the sound of his voice, when he used to talk. So all these women used to come to the library just so they could listen to him speak.

"It's important to acknowledge people who have come from Côte Saint-Luc, especially writers who are internationally known," Abramovitch said.

Mayor Anthony Housefather pointed out that Layton developed his international reputation while living in the city.

"I think that brings pride not only to Côte Saint-Luc, but to all of the Greater Montreal Island."

Montreal Street Named After Layton, CBC, Aug 15 06

CBC.ca/CBC News
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/story/2006/08/15/layton-avenue.html
Poet Irving Layton to have street named for him
Last Updated: Tuesday, August 15, 2006 | 4:46 PM ET

Legendary Montreal poet Irving Layton will have a street named for him in his old neighbourhood in the city of Côte Saint-Luc.

Council Monday night voted to name a street that is still being built Irving Layton Avenue.

Layton died Jan. 4 at a Montreal residence for seniors. He had been battling Alzheimer's disease for some time. The author of more than 40 books of poetry and essays was widely considered one of English Canada's pre-eminent poets.

He was once nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature, but was beaten out by Gabriel García Márquez, a Colombian novelist.

The director of the Eleanor London Côte Saint-Luc Public Library, Tanya Abramovitch, said Tuesday people still remember him and his regular visits to the library.

"They loved the sound of his voice, when he used to talk. So all these women used to come to the library just so they could listen to him speak.

"It's important to acknowledge people who have come from Côte Saint-Luc, especially writers who are internationally known," Abramovitch said.

Mayor Anthony Housefather pointed out that Layton developed his international reputation while living in the city.

"I think that brings pride not only to Côte Saint-Luc, but to all of the Greater Montreal Island."

A Genius by Joshers Aug 31 06

Layton was a fucking magician. Layton was a god damn genius. Layton was the penis of canada. Layton was a nome damn i wish i could spell. Layton used language that was complex, eloquent, musical, rhythmical, like nobody else around.
Layton was the kind of guy you despise. But Keep inviting, keep listening.
Layton was really a newsboy with the features of a gargoyle. The night before his death, the snow flakes were fat as globs of cholestrol, on the streets of Ottawa, so beautiful.

First Cdn Poet Translated into Italian, J Pivato, Sept 2 06

Thank you Giorgio for your kind words
about Irving Layton. You remind me
of this poet who taught me creative
writing at York University in 1970.
As you point out he was the first
Canadian poet translated into Italian.
He did much to promote Canadian Literature and identity.

It is appropriate then that you,
Poet Laureat of Toronto, should make
us remember this poet from Montreal.
-- Joseph Pivato, Edmonton